Fire Services Design

With a team of Competent Fire Safety Practitioners (CFSP), we can match you with the most experienced and talented fire designer for any building project.

Fire Safety Certificate Requirements

Building owners having a fire safety schedule are required to provide a copy of the fire safety certificate to the Commissioner of Fire and Rescue NSW (FRNSW).

Building owners must provide a copy of fire safety certificate to FRNSW as soon as possible after the certificate is issued as required under Clause 172 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment (EP & A) Regulation 2000. The fire safety certificate is a certificate stating that the fire safety measures within the building are capable of performing to the standard defined by the fire safety schedule. Fire Safety Certificate is issued at the completion of building works involving the fire safety measure and is required before an Occupation Certificate (OC) can be issued by the Building Certifier.

There are 2 different types of fire safety certificates, Interim and Final. The interim fire safety certificate covers each essential fire safety measure specified in the fire safety schedule for the part of the building to which the certificate relates, and in which interim occupation is being sought. The final fire safety certificate covers each essential fire safety measure specified in the fire safety schedule for the building.

Commencing 1 December 2017, the fire safety certificate is to be produced using the Fire Safety Certificate form which is available from NSW Planning and Environment website.

A properly qualified person i.e. Competent Fire Safety Practitioner (CFSP) must inspect and verify the performance of each fire safety measure being assessed, and test the operation of each new item of equipment installed within the building that is included in the current fire safety schedule. The building owner can choose which qualified person (CFSP) certifies each fire safety measure, who is typically a representative of the fire protection company engaged to install that system.

You’ll need a fire safety certificate if any of the following apply:

  • The building is new
  • The building has changed use
  • A fire safety order has been issued for the building or premises.

To be eligible for this certificate, you’ll need to make sure that you have met all the essential fire safety measures listed in the most recent fire safety schedule.

You must also:

  • Lodge a copy of the fire safety certificate (together with the current schedule) with Fire and Rescue NSW (FRNSW)
  • Display a copy of the fire safety certificate in the building.

You’ll need to have a final fire safety certificate from your local council before a final occupation certificate can be issued for a new or existing building.

Note: The local council is the regulatory authority on this matter and may impose penalties if fire safety certificates are not conducted correctly or provided in a timely manner.

Our Fire Protection Services

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Fire Services Design

With a team of Competent Fire Safety Practitioners (CFSP), we can match you with the most experienced and talented fire designer for any building project. More

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Drafting

With our experienced drafters, we are able to produce your design in electronic form e.g. AUTOCAD for your project so that drawings can be saved in soft copy and future amendments can be altered electronically in the future. More

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Fire Safety Engineering

Our fire safety engineers can develop alternative building solutions using performance based requirements to overcome non-compliance with the deemed to satisfy provisions of the Building Code of Australia (BCA). More

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Building Approval

Council or Building Certifier Approval is arguably the most stressful item to complete in any project. Let us help manage the building certification for you. More

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Fire Protection Installation

Selecting the right installer is critical. FSP painstakingly screen and filter out the best competent fire installers in the market for you. More

Frequently Asked Questions.

What are essential fire safety measures in a building?

They are prescribed by the Clause 166 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulations 2000.

Essential fire safety measures are installed within a building or premises to perform a vital function in protecting life and preventing injury in the event of fire and are listed below (not exhaustive):

  • Automatic fire detection and alarm systems
  • Automatic fire suppression systems
  • Wall-wetting sprinkler and drencher systems
  • Emergency lighting • Emergency warning and intercommunication systems
  • Exit signs
  • Fire hydrant systems
  • Hose reel systems
  • Smoke alarms and heat alarms
  • Mechanical air handling systems
  • Portable fire extinguishers
  • Smoke and heat vents
  • Fire doors
  • Smoke doors
  • Solid core doors
  • Emergency lifts
  • Fire control centres and rooms
  • Fire dampers
  • Fire seals protecting openings in fire-resisting components of the building
  • Fire shutters
  • Fire windows
  • Lightweight construction
  • Perimeter vehicle access for emergency vehicles
  • Smoke dampers
  • Standby power systems
  • Warning and operational signs
  • Access panels, doors and hoppers to fire-resisting shafts
  • Automatic fail-safe devices
  • Safety curtains in proscenium openings